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Internet Architecture and Innovation (MIT Press) (English Edition) eBook Kindle


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Número de páginas: 592 páginas Dicas de vocabulário: Habilitado Idioma: Inglês

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Descrições do Produto

Descrição do produto

Today -- following housing bubbles, bank collapses, and high unemployment -- the Internet remains the most reliable mechanism for fostering innovation and creating new wealth. The Internet's remarkable growth has been fueled by innovation. In this pathbreaking book, Barbara van Schewick argues that this explosion of innovation is not an accident, but a consequence of the Internet's architecture -- a consequence of technical choices regarding the Internet's inner structure that were made early in its history.The Internet's original architecture was based on four design principles: modularity, layering, and two versions of the celebrated but often misunderstood end-to-end arguments. But today, the Internet's architecture is changing in ways that deviate from the Internet's original design principles, removing the features that have fostered innovation and threatening the Internet's ability to spur economic growth, to improve democratic discourse, and to provide a decentralized environment for social and cultural interaction in which anyone can participate. If no one intervenes, network providers' interests will drive networks further away from the original design principles. If the Internet's value for society is to be preserved, van Schewick argues, policymakers will have to intervene and protect the features that were at the core of the Internet's success.

Sobre o Autor

Barbara van Schewick is Associate Professor of Law at Stanford Law School, Director of Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society, and Associate Professor (by courtesy) of Electrical Engineering in Stanford University's Department of Electrical Engineering.


Detalhes do produto

  • Formato: eBook Kindle
  • Tamanho do arquivo: 4778 KB
  • Número de páginas: 592 páginas
  • Editora: The MIT Press (24 de agosto de 2012)
  • Vendido por: Amazon Servicos de Varejo do Brasil Ltda
  • Idioma: Inglês
  • ASIN: B007UVE508
  • Leitura de texto: Habilitado
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  • Dicas de vocabulário: Habilitado
  • Configuração de fonte: Não habilitado
  • Avaliação média: Seja o primeiro a avaliar este item
  • Lista de mais vendidos da Amazon: #253,637 entre os mais vendidos na Loja Kindle (Conheça os 100 mais vendidos na Loja Kindle)

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Avaliações mais úteis de consumidores na Amazon.com (beta) (Pode incluir avaliações do Programa de Recompensas para Primeiros Avaliadores)

Amazon.com: 3.7 de 5 estrelas 9 avaliações
Esta avaliação foi considerada útil por 1 de 1 pessoa(s):
3.0 de 5 estrelas Didn't understand the book 9 de setembro de 2013
Por Eric Morrow - Publicada na Amazon.com
Formato: Capa comum Compra verificada
I got this book on Fred Wilson's recommendation. I found it academic and confusing. Which doesn't mean that it isn't a good or important book. But it was inaccessible to me. I work in the internet space as a digital marketer and I was hoping to learn more about the technical underpinnings of the net and how that relates to innovation (the title of the book after all).
Esta avaliação foi considerada útil por 1 de 2 pessoa(s):
5.0 de 5 estrelas This is a remarkable book combining a deep understanding of ... 4 de janeiro de 2015
Por Mark Goetsch - Publicada na Amazon.com
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This is a remarkable book combining a deep understanding of economics with the impact on technical implementation. It follows the principles developed by Carlyss Baldwin and Kim Clark on modularity (inspired by Ronald Coase) as a starting point to define architecture beyond technical implementation ( architecture is not engineering as one reviewer failed to notice). She then cast it as a model to tie this into the Internet bringing legal strength to the arguments of Net neutrality. If there is anything missing she could have referenced Coase directly since he founded the area of economics and law. This however would have made for a more compelling academic treatment, but would have lost the more general audience she was reaching.
Esta avaliação foi considerada útil por 11 de 14 pessoa(s):
5.0 de 5 estrelas One of the most important books in tech policy in a decade 13 de agosto de 2010
Por Marvin Ammori - Publicada na Amazon.com
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This is an important and brilliant book, which I consider required reading for anyone interested in or serious about the Internet or innovation.

I have written a review of this book on my blog ([...]) and on the Huffington Post.

As I say there, this book is one of the very few books in the field of Internet policy that is in the same league as Larry Lessig's Code: And Other Laws of Cyberspace, Version 2.0, in 2000, and Yochai Benkler's The Wealth of Networks: How Social Production Transforms Markets and Freedom, in 2006, in terms of its originality, depth, and importance to Internet policy and other disciplines. I expect the book to affect how people think about the Internet; about the interactions between law and technical architectures in all areas of law; about entrepreneurship in general. I also think her insights on innovation economics, which strike me as far more persuasive than lawyers' usual assumptions, should influence "law and economics" thinking for the better.

Books this good don't come along every day--or even every year-and I'm already late to the praise-party. Harvard Law professor Larry Lessig (the trail-blazing cyberlaw champion) recommended it in the New York Times this week; Susan Crawford (a law professor who served as a top White House advisor) recommended it in an op-ed in Salon/GigaOm yesterday; Brad Burnham, the venture capitalist who was featured earlier this week in the NYT's Room for Debate, also posted an endorsing review on his blog. MIT engineering professor David Reed (one of the key architects of the IP protocol, inventor of the UDP protocol) praises it on the book jacket.

It is not easy material--the Internet's technologies and how innovation actually evolves--but she writes for a general audience, not a technologist or lawyer, and you will learn a lot from, and be challenged by, the ideas in this book.
Esta avaliação foi considerada útil por 0 de 1 pessoa(s):
5.0 de 5 estrelas Excellent 22 de abril de 2014
Por Soldado - Publicada na Amazon.com
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Excellent book on Internet architecture and particularly on the end-to-end principle. Anyone interested in learning more about net neutrality should pick this up.
Esta avaliação foi considerada útil por 5 de 6 pessoa(s):
5.0 de 5 estrelas Run, don't walk, to buy this book 14 de abril de 2011
Por Christopher Parsons - Publicada na Amazon.com
Formato: Capa dura
I want to very highly recommend this book. Various authors, advocates, scholars, and businesses have spoken about the economic impacts of the Internet, but to date there hasn't been a detailed economic accounting of what may happen if/when ISPs monitor and control the flow of data across their networks. van Schewick has filled this gap.

Her book traces economic impacts associated with changing the Internet's structure from one enabling any innovator to design an application or share content online to a structure where ISPs must first authorize access to content and design key applications (e.g. P2P, email, etc) in house. Barbara draws heavily from Internet history literatures and economic theory to buttress her position that a closed or highly controlled Internet not only constitutes a massive change in the architecture of the 'net, but that this change would be damaging to society's economic, cultural, and political interests. She argues that an increasingly controlled Internet is the future that many ISPs prefer, and supports this conclusion with economic theory and the historical actions of American telecommunications corporations.

van Schewick begins by outlining two notions of the end-to-end principle undergirding the 'net, a narrow and broad conception, and argues (successfully, in my mind) that ISPs and their interrogators often rely on different end-to-end understandings in making their respective arguments to the public, regulators, and each other. This reliance on differing notions of end-to-end have led the defenders of these differing shades of the end-to-end principle to speak past one another. Further, divergent understandings of the end-to-end architectural discussion has created, and continues to create, rifts between engineers, between those who were (and remain) central to the development of the 'net more generally, and between those publishing technically informed economic writings about the Internet.

After differentiating between the narrow and broad approaches to end-to-end, van Schewick identifies the impacts of different Internet architectures on the costs of innovation, the resulting organizational makeup of innovating parties, and the effects architecture has on the competition of complementary goods (e.g. VoIP, filesharing, email, etc as opposed to the actual hardware composing the Internet). After laying this groundwork, van Schewick works through how deviations from the 'broad' end-to-end argument affect innovation and the consequences of centralized versus decentralized application development and content distribution. The book concludes with an analysis of the public versus private interests in network architectures, with the author asserting that citizens and their public representatives must understand the impacts of architecture on the Internet's future. ISPs are attempting to better control and monetize their networks, and these attempts may undermine the possibilities of innovation while sacrificing the long-term evolution of the 'net so that companies can realize short-term profits. Such sacrifices must be critically interrogated by a public that is increasingly relying on digital communications in all facets of life and business.

This is a heavy read, a read made heavier if you haven't spent some time reading economic theory, elements of the network neutrality debates of the past decade, and a little on the evolution of American telecommunications in the past two decades. This said, the author generally does a terrific job in walking the reader through every facet of her argument, using examples and sidenotes to expand and clarify more troublesome sections of the book (especially as it relates to economic theory and approaches to innovation). I highly recommend this book - it's worth every penny that it will cost you. It also includes an extensive set of citations and reference list (about 160 pages worth) that will be helpful for any subsequent research or reading beyond the text itself.

If I have a criticism of the book it's that it tends to be very American-centric. While the principles contained in the book remain general enough that readers can lay the theoretical model she traces upon the telecommunications landscape of non-US states, this is a bit of work that non-American readers will have to do when examining their own telecommunications landscape through her lens. This may somewhat limit the book's immediate guidance to policy makers, policy analysts, economists, Internet governance scholars, and concerned/interested citizens more generally, but not so much that any of these readers should stay away.

I have a suspicion that this book will become one of the centrepieces for Internet governance literatures in coming years, and likely to be as influential Benkler's The Wealth of Networks: How Social Production Transforms Markets and Freedom with regards to the economics of the Internet. If issues around Internet governance, innovation, and control are your cup of tea then consider this book an absolute must buy.
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